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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

6 edition of An introduction to languages and language in Africa found in the catalog.

An introduction to languages and language in Africa

by Alexandre, Pierre

  • 36 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Heinemann Educational in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • African languages

  • Edition Notes

    Statementtranslated [from the French] by F. A. Leary.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPL8005 .A413 1972b
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 133 p.
    Number of Pages133
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5334050M
    ISBN 100435280651, 043528066X
    LC Control Number72187300

    With anywhere between and languages, Africa is home to approximately one-third of the world's languages. The diversity of Africa's languages is evidenced by their populations. In total, there are at least 75 languages in Africa which have more than one million speakers. The rest are spoken by populations ranging from a few hundred to several hundred thousand . The languages of Africa are divided into several major language families. Niger–Congo or perhaps Atlantic–Congo languages (Bantu and non-Bantu, the inclusion of Mande and a few other groups is disputed) are spoken in West, Central, Southeast and Southern Africa.; Afroasiatic languages are spread throughout Western Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa .

    6 Languages of sub-Saharan Africa Nilo-Saharan languages Niger-Congo languages Khoisan languages Focus on: Official languages, trade languages and creole languages in sub-Saharan Africa 7 Languages of eastern Asia Sino-Tibetan languages Austro-Asiatic languages Tai-Kadai languages The African continent has some 2 indigenous African languages (Heine & Nurse, ) and this total represents nearly one-third of the world’s languages. The languages of Africa are classified into four major groups: Afro-Asiatic, Nilo-Saharan, Niger-Congo and KhoiSan. The complex spectrum of the indigenous languages of South Africa is aFile Size: KB.

    At least thirty-five languages indigenous to South Africa are spoken in the Republic, ten of which are official languages of South Africa: Ndebele, Northern Sotho, Sotho, SiSwati, Tsonga, Tswana, Venda, Xhosa, Zulu and Afrikaans. The eleventh official language is South African English.   A fable by the major Kenyan author Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o has been translated into over 30 languages, making it “the single most translated short story in the history of African .


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An introduction to languages and language in Africa by Alexandre, Pierre Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is the first general introduction to African languages and linguistics to be published in English. It covers the four major language groupings (Niger-Congo, Nilo-Saharan, Afroasiatic and Khoisan), the core areas of modern theoretical linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax), typology, sociolinguistics, comparative linguistics, and language, history and by: Providing an introduction to the linguistic study of African languages, the orientation adopted throughout this book is a descriptive-structural-typological one, Cited by:   This book is an introduction to African languages and linguistics, covering typology, structure and sociolinguistics.

The twelve chapters are written by a team of fifteen eminent Africanists, and their topics include the four major language groupings (Niger-Congo, Nilo-Saharan, Afroasiatic and Khoisan), 4/5(1).

An introduction to languages and language in Africa. [Pierre Alexandre] -- This is a brisk and entertaining guide to the myriad languages of black Africa.

It studies languages as part of the life of the peoples of Africa and relates them to the politics, economics and. Providing an introduction to the linguistic study of African languages, the orientation adopted throughout this book is a descriptive-structural-typological one, as opposed to a formal-theoretical : This chapter is illustrated with a wide variety of African language data.

In the section on negation, Watters cites data from nine different languages: Aghem, Lobala, Igbo, Fer, Tera, Hausa, Logbara, Kru, and Linda, representing various language families and phyla. involved in African linguistics.

The introduction presents some reasons for studying African languages, but there are many others found in the following chapters themselves. What this book will not cover is topics tangential to core descriptive linguistic concerns: language and literature, performance, philosophy, etc.

An Introduction to African Languages Article (PDF Available) in Studies in Language 33(1) January with 3, Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Jeff Good. Language issue has been considered as a major problem to Africa. The continent has so many distinct languages as well as distinct ethnic groups.

It is the introduction of the colonial languages that enable Africans to communicate with each other intelligibly: otherwise, Africa has no one central language. Still, a number of characteristics present themselves.

The writers of the third wave are younger people in the main, writing (by and large) for an African as opposed to a Euro-American audience, and attempting to reach a far wider audience in their countries than the prominent writers of the s and s. Africa, the languages of Africa, an overview of linguistics, languages in contact, languages in competition (including a discussion of the Suba language situation in Kenya), and basic introductions to phonetics, phonology, morphosyntax, lexical and semantic tools, and discourse.

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication data. African languages:an introduction / edited by Bernd Heine (Universität zu Köhn) and Derek Nurse (Memorial University of Newfoundland).

The controversy over which language or languages African writers should or may usein producing their literary works has often been presented as involving two opposing camps: a camp for indigenous African languages and against foreign (European) languages, led particularly by Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, and a camp largely in favor of adopted European.

1 1 Introduction Pidgins and creoles and linguistics What earlier generations thought of pidgin and creole languages is all too clear from their very names: broken English, bastard Portuguese, nigger French, kombuistaaltje (‘cookhouse lingo’), isikula (‘coolie language’).

This. Assuming no prior knowledge of linguistics, AN INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE, Tenth Edition, is appropriate for a variety of fields--including education, languages, psychology, cognitive science, anthropology, English, and teaching English as a Second Language (TESL)--at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

This completely updated edition retains the clear Reviews: 1. Breaking with the traditional approach to the continent’s language question by focusing on the often overlooked issue of the link between African languages and economic development, Language Policy and Economics considers African languages an integral part of a nation’s socio-political and economic development.

Therefore, the book argues. An undergraduate degree in African literature and languages will require several semesters of coursework in African language, as well as an introduction to African linguistics.

Potential studies in African language might include Afrikaans, Amharic, Igbo and Sudanese Arabic, as well as Swahili, Tigrinya, Twi, Wolof, Yoruba and Zulu. English language in Africa: An impediment or a contributor to development.

Nigussie Negash Introduction The African continent is a vast region with a huge resource, both material and human (cultural and linguistic). However, it is one of the neglected regions in the world. Even in the field of English language teaching (ELT) we do not hear about as.

Heine and Nurse’s African Languages: An Introduction (AL) includes 11 articles of relevance to African linguistics written by specialists who have pursued knowledge on their respective topics for decades (4), and an introduction written by the editors that outlines the tome’s purpose and contents, in addition to sparking readers’ interest.

African languages and some of the current controversies in classification. Map 2. Language map of Africa (Crystal ) pattern of one language having different meanings. In (3) is shown how using An Introduction to African Languages. The essays in Languages in Africa explore the layers of African multilingualism as they affect language policy and education.

Through case studies ranging across the continent, the contributors consider multilingualism in the classroom as well as in domains ranging from music and film to politics and figurative language.Key words: French, second additional language, South Africa, language market, multi- and plurilingualism.

1. Introduction The teaching of languages in South African schools has long been fraught with debate, tensions and sensitivities, particularly in relation to the continued exclusion and marginalisation of African : Karen Aline Françoise Ferreira-Meyers, Fiona Horne.

Ch. 2, ‘Classification of African languages’, outlines the four African phyla, and deals with approaches to African classification, and with some local problems. This chapter has a wealth of maps, tables, and figures, a fine feature characterizing the whole book (also a superb CD, with many things readers have probably heard about but never Author: Derek Nurse.